Tag Archive: 4SEASons


This year, with the whole broken ankle thing, I didn’t make the icebreaker challenge. Luckily, that doesn’t mean I had to miss out on the lovely lunch and celebrations yesterday!

Such a lovely time in the sun with such lovely swimming friends!

A big congratulations to all the 2013 Icebreakers! I’ll be up there with you next year!

Full photo set over on Flikr

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Tuesday’s pacing session was a good one. I hadn’t dropped as much as I’d thought (I’ve been focussing on distance, rather than speed lately, for obvious reasons) and it was good to get into that rhythm and focus on pacing. Less than two weeks out to the goal swim, it was nice to stretch out and remind myself what pace feels like,   what going hard feels like, and what tired feels like. I’m pretty damn sure those things are all going to be very important next Sunday.

It’s been a couple of weeks since I had attended a Tuesday session, and it was a pretty busy session, with quite a lot of swimmers. It really highlighted to me the importance of good lane etiquette. Lane etiquette makes things run much more smoothly and everyone can get on and do their thing and get a good workout. With many swimmers in a lane, even if they’re supposedly keeping to a particular pace each, you do get differences in speed and in pace. Some people swim faster or more variably or more consistently, and it really brought home that the etiquette is there for a reason, and that the reason is that it works.

My personal favourite guide to lap swimming etiquette in general is via this link that I’m reasonably certain i’ve put up before. If I haven’t, I should have. It’s an excellent general set of guidelines for if you’re new to pool swimming, particularly lap swimming.

What it does say is spot on. However these were written with straight up lap swimming involved, and I suspect they were based on random strangers making the best of self-regulating in public lap swimming.

 

Pacing sessions, on the other hand, are similar but different. Pretty much all of the general rules apply but there is the added complexity of the “rest” (in inverted commas because most of the time those seconds are the shortest 10-15 seconds of your life)periods at various points in the set.

My additional tips (my personal option only as usual) for these sets are based on the things that I know really work, because the squad I swim with are pretty good at these things, and our coaches believe in enforcing the same principles as they really make things easier and better for everyone.

So Jacki’s extra rules for pacing sessions are….

  1. Start with the basics. All the general etiquette for lap swimming still applies.
  2. Keep to the plan. The coaches devise a set and if everyone sticks to it, the faster swimmers head off first, if there’s a spread they may end up passing hte back of hte pack, but it shouldn’t happen more than needed.
  3. That includes the rest periods. In my experience, pretty much everyone gets the hang of the swimming part quite easily. the first big challenge is in the rest periods of 10 or 15 seconds. I understand it…you’ve been swimming hard, and if it’s near the end of the set you’ve been doing that for quite some time. It’s really tempting to take a few seconds extra to recover. And a few more, and a few more again. Problem is, if everyone starts doing their own thing here, the order gets all out of whack. Nobody wants to get to the end of their lap, have the person in front still resting when you’re due to take off again, and have them pass you…every. freaking. lap.
  4. On that note, either get a watch you can wear in the water and read, or learn how to read the clock. I get why this is hard. The more tired I get the less capable I am of even counting, let alone calculating lap times. It’s not really that complicated, though, and generally you have somewhere in the vicinity of 50-100m metres to think about it. Even I, at my most stuffed, can work out my start time plus 2 minutes….
  5. Listen to the coach. It’s kind of related to point 4…in that if I have enough of a hard time counting as I get tired, I don’t need to be worrying about trying to figure out what the hell I’m supposed to be doing next. Let alone disrupting the swimmers around me by stopping them to ask them. OK – I admit I’m not always 100% good at this…but I’m trying!
  6. Other than that…common sense is always a good idea. In life, the universe and everything. But especially in swimming.

 

Tuesday training – endurance set as usual. Or not.

As I’m sure I’ve mentioned before, I have a bit of a love/hate relationship with the endurance sets. They’re hard, but really rewarding and deliver results like nothing else I’ve ever done. It’s great that I now have the hang of the, and that I trust them so much that I push myself, knowing that they work.

Seems it’s possible I’ve become complacent, though.

Coaches Kingy and Zoe had something new in store for us…and it wasn’t pretty. particularly for me. Since they chose the one thing I am absolutely the WORST at! I really, really, really suck at this. After 2 and a half years of training, and managing to get my technique a little better and my time trials up to medium, I still do so more strokes per lap than anyone I know. that means I’m outputting way too much effort to get where i’m going…probably due to some still-outstanding issue with my technique that means I’m likely causing more drag than I need to. I have a few theories, but I’ll trust in the Wednesday technique sets to work on things piece by piece and keep chipping away at things like my front-quadrant swimming, my high elbow, my too-high breathing, my bottom-heavy position in the water…the list never ends! Lucky that means I’m unlikely to get bored with this any time soon.

When I’m feeling like this, immediately after I spend some time with my inner monologue getting angry for a bit, I start to calm down and actually think about what’s going on with me at that moment.

So, here are the conclusions I came to:

  1. This was outside of my comfort zone. I’ve been doing these endurance sets for a while, and whilst they’re bloody hard work, I know they work. they really work. So why mess with it? (answer: if you always do what you’ve always done….guess what you get?)
  2. See point one. It’s worth mentioning twice.
  3. It’s ok for things to be hard, and challenging. sometimes they will be emotionally challenging, too. And I have to let that be OK. Everything really tough for me in this sport has been the result of hard work and effort. This is no different
  4. Some day’s, no matter how much you love the sport, you’re just not gonna feel the love. Check the archives, it’s not the first time this has happened. Nobody loves everything all the time. Nobody, nothing.
  5. the last thought is one I come back to time and again, particularly when I hit a hurdle with technique stuff. Even elite athletes do technique training. People are people and nobody does it exactly right all the time. It takes work and practice and you need to make each and every little millimetres of your body and mind about muscle memory and good habits. I may feel like it’s a job that’s never done, but in reality that’s because it’s a job that’s never done.

Comfort-Zone

Medium-Lane

OMG, it’s official! I’m in the medium lane! With the extra squad members picked up this season, many of whom are doing the Coogee Swim Challenge, our Tuesday squad now needs 3 lanes. My times have been improving since August, so I’m now well and truly middle of the pack. I couldn’t be more thrilled!

Just goes to show that if you stick with something long enough and work hard enough at it, you can get the results…in fact they can even sneak up on you!

The session itself was an endurance and pacing set that I’m now very familiar with. I felt pretty comfortable maintaining my time trial average 100m pace the whole way. Given I felt I could have done a bit better with my time trial without my runaway cap issues, I’m even considering taking the drastic step of knocking a second or two off my pace from next week.

I know it’s an outrageous suggestion…so wish me luck!

As the old saying goes…”Be careful what you wish for”.

Remember that post where I was kind of hoping for a time trial? Well I got what I wished for. Of course it was the first swim back after a week on holiday (with a sneaky 1km race for good measure).

Still, I was OK with the idea. It’s been ages since I’ve done a time trial…although I’ve been on the other side of the clipboard with my mentor duties this season and can not attest to the fact that keeping track of multiple swimmers at varying paces can be least (if not more) challenging that actually swimming a time trial yourself!

So off I went. In this sort of thing a 1km time trial in the pool is pretty standard, but for various reasons, we started with a 500m trial and then stuck with it for a while for the sake of comparison. Seems this was the day to return to form…and double the distance!  Not a problem…and probably an advantage for me since I do relatively better with longer distances, but it can still mess with your head when you’re used to doing something and measuring yourself and how you feel a certain way. So that was a challenge, but not enough of one for me to worry.

I was completely certain that my times have improved markedly, so even with a week off, I was ready and raring to go.

And then my cap decided to go a bit weird. I know, I know. The story about the tradesman blaming his tools and all that. But it was seriously weird, man. (even weirder than me starting that last sentence with a preposition and finishing it with “man”). This was my official 4SEASons orange and blue printed silicon cap. It’s a great cap and I’ve worn it a lot over the past months. It’s generally done pretty well at doing the one job it was designed for: keeping my hair out of may face.

Tonight, though, I felt as though my cap had been watching Braveheart and had taken the cry of “Freedoooooom” just a little bit too seriously.

It was trying to escape.

You wouldn’t think that this would be such a big problem, and I guess it wasn’t a huge thing, but it definitely cost me some time. For a start I did have to break my stroke several times to try to tug the stupid thing down. I also skipped tumble turns after the first one as there was no chance that thing was staying on my head through even one single more turn. But mostly, my hair was was struggling out from under the front, but the edge of the cap was actually holding it down in my eyes. I couldn’t see much at all which made it hard to swim straight and impossible to pass.

So, although thwarted by a humble swim cap (you’d think I’d have figure out how to actually use one by now) I did manage to improve my times…quite a bit in fact, but given what I’ve been using for my endurance pace I’d kinda set myself up for a little faster.

Still…it prompted me to look back at the time trials I’ve done in the last couple of months (since August last year). If you don’t worry about the distance, and just look at the average 100m pace, I’ve dropped a whopping 16 seconds per 100m! Clearly the type and amount of training I’ve been doing has been working a treat. I may have started off dismal, and worked my way through plain old slow, but I’m well and truly on my way faster than I could have hoped….the medium lane! With a big thanks to coaches Kingy and Zoe from 4SEASons for running such a great squad that I actually want to train.

Onward and upward (perhaps with a remedial class in swim caps 101!)

There was bad news and good news on Saturday. the bad news was that there’s no more Can Too training for the season. The good news was that lots of Can Too swimmers showed up to do the 4SEASons swim on Saturday morning. I’m certain the 9am start, and the title sleep-in it allow for helped! As did the looming goal event for those doing the 1km and/or 2km the next day at the North Bondi Classic.

Above all, the good weather stuck around, giving us a glorious day for getting in the water. The sun was shining and there were even pods of dolphins swimming in the bay! I was hoping they might come over for a bit of a closer look at the crazy humans thinking they could swim (it’s happened once before), but for today we had to be satisfied with watching them from a distance.

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We swam a medium distance, with a slightly shorter session. This was for the benefit of those really wanting to save their best for tomorrow’s race. There is benefit to a bit of a taper in training if you have a big event you want to do your best at. It means you’re going into the event at your peak, not tired or sore from training. As a general rule, you don’t gain any extra fitness in your last two weeks of training, and hopefully by then any tweaks to technique are well and truly embedded, so it’s a matter of eating well, not drinking too much, and doing any last emotional and psychological preparation you need to. Keeping up your presence in the water is part of that, and I have to say, it was a pretty easy task on a day as lovely as Saturday. Especially with the return to beach training of the truly-inspiring Fiona!

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